Tag Archives: Atlantic

NJ, HHW and Spring – Perfect Together

Spring is in full bloom, the weather is nice and at for ANJHHWC members and many New Jersey counties this means the household hazardous waste circus is rolling into town. Below is a summary of HHW activity happening in New Jersey for the remainder of Spring 2010.

For ANJHHWC members it’s a good opportunity to click on the link to each county and view their individual Websites to see how they are promoting their HHW programs online.  All the counties and links to their programs are consolidated in this posting below.

  • Atlantic County
    • Saturday, May 1, 2010
      Atlantic County Utilities Authority, 6700 Delilah Rd., Egg Harbor Twp.
  • Bergen County
    • Saturday, May 15, 2010
      Bergen County Campgaw Mountain Reservation, 200 Campgaw Rd., Mahwah, NJ
    • Sunday, June 13, 2010
      Bergen Community College, 400 Paramus Rd., Paramus, NJ
  • Burlington County
    • Permanent Facility open all year contact the county at (609) 499-5200
  • Camden County
    • Saturday, May 15, 2010, (HHW Only)
      Atco, Corner of Atco & Raritan Avenues
    • Saturday, June 12, 2010 (HHW and Electronics)
      Camden County College, Peter Cheeseman Road, Parking Lot behind “CIM” Building
  • Cape May County
    • Saturday, May 8, 2010
      Cape May Transfer Station in Middle Twp.
  • Cumberland County
    • Saturday, June 5, 2010
      County Complex , Bridgeton
  • Essex County
    • Saturday, May 1, 2010, (HHW Only)
      Essex County Fleet Maintenance Garage, 99 West Bradford Avenue, Cedar Grove, NJ 07009
    • Saturday, May 15, 2010, (Electronics Only)
      Essex County Fleet Maintenance Garage, 99 West Bradford Avenue, Cedar Grove, NJ 07009
  • Gloucester County
    • Saturday, May 8, 2010
      GCSWC, South Harrison
    • Saturday, May 22, 2010
      GCRD, Clayton
  • Hudson County
    • Saturday, May 8, 2010
      • Jersey City, JCIA, 501 Route 440
      • Kearny DPW, 357 Bergen Ave.
    • Sunday, May 16, 2010
      • Bayonne, Norton Paints, 148 East 5th Street, North Bergen
      • North Bergen MUA, 6200 Tonnelle Avenue
  • Hunterdon County
    • July 10, 2010
      314 State Route 12, Hunterdon County Complex, Flemington, NJ 08822
  • Mercer County
    • Saturday, May 8, 2010, (Electronics Only),
      Sun Center, 81 Hamilton Ave, Lot 1, Trenton
    • Saturday, June 26, 2010 is the next HHW day.
  • Middlesex County
    • Saturday, May 15, 2010
      Middlesex County Division of Highways – Sayerville, 750 Jernee Mill Road, Sayerville, NJ 08872
  • Monmouth County
    • Saturday, May 22, 2010
      Monmouth County Garage, Union Ave., Off Rt. 36, Hazlet, NJ, (Behind Burger King)
    • Open all year is the Permanent facility.
  • Morris County
    • Saturday, May 8, 2010
      Chatham High School, 255 Lafayette Ave., Chatham, NJ 07928
    • Saturday, June 12, 2010
      Firefighter & Police Training Academy, 500 West Hanover Ave., Parsippany, NJ 07054
    • Open all year is the Mount Olive Permanent facility.
  • Ocean County
    • During the spring and fall of each year the Ocean County conducts a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Program with numerous collection days offered. Pre-registration is required to participate. For more information, call the Ocean County Solid Waste Management Hotline at 1-800-55-RECYCLE.
  • Passaic County
    • 2010 HHW disposal days – information is unavailable, contact the county at (973) 305-5738
  • Salem County
    • If you missed the April 17, 2010 program you will have to wait for the next one scheduled for October 16, 2010.
  • Somerset County
    • Saturday, May 8, 2010
      Warren Township Public Works Garage, 1 Bardy Road, Warren
    • Saturday, June 12, 2010
      South County Public Works Garage, 410 Roycefield Road , Hillsborough
  • Sussex County
    • Saturday, May 1, 2010 (Electronics Only)
    • Saturday, June 5, 2010, (HHW Only)
    • All program take place at the Sussex County Municipal Utilities Authority, Solid Waste / Recycling Facility, 34 South Rt. 94, Lafayette, N.J. 07848. For More Information Call (973) 579-6998
  • Union County
    • Saturday, May 15, 2010, (Electronics Only)
      Union County College, Cranford Campus
    • Saturday, June 12, 2010, (HHW Only)
      Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Ave., New Providence, NJ
  • Warren County
    • If you missed the recent April 25, 2010 HHW and electronics event you will need to contact the county at (908) 453-2174 to find out when the next event is.

2006-10-04 – ANJHHWC Meeting Minutes

Location: Atlantic County Wastewater Treatment Complex, home of the windmills!

Call to Order – The meeting was opened by President Diana Vigilante at 10:15 a.m. at the Atlantic County Wastewater Treatment Complex, home of the windmills!

Diana Vigilante reported that DOT Training, which is required every three (3) years, has been set up for Wednesday, February 28th at the Middlesex County Fire Academy .  An instructor from UMDNJ will be providing the training and there is a limit of 25 students.  Cost is $100 per person.  Contact Carole Tolmachewich from Middlesex County for registration information.

A discussion was held regarding our upcoming Holiday Meeting/Luncheon.  Alan Fortier from Monmouth County offered to contact Supreme Recycling to see if they would provide a facility tour for our December meeting.  [Holiday meeting was planned for December 6th in Ocean County with a luncheon at Charlie Browns with a tour of Supreme to follow].

Nomination Committee

Terms for all current officers expire at year end so a nomination committee is needed for 2007.   Fred Stanger volunteered to head committee and Melinda Williams will assist.

Flares

Fred Stanger from Middlesex County asked if other counties were having issues with flares (especially boat flares).  These are not accepted by vendors at Household Hazardous Waste Days.  Vincent Mroz, Operations Manager for Clean Harbors Environmental Services, explained that boat flares are explosive and shipping them with other waste is a major concern.

Ron Berenato said that Dennis DeMatte said that he thought marinas may need to accept them back.  Melinda Williams suggested we reach out to a manufacturer.  Fred offered to call.

All Household Hazardous Waste bids for Clean Harbors should be sent to:

Vincent Mroz
2858 Route 322
P.O. Box 337
Bridgeport , NJ 08014
(856) 467-7443)
mroz@vincent@cleanharbors.com

County Updates

  • Hudson County reported that Panasonic and Sony worked with the County and paid for all their electronics recycling.  Best Buy donated 300 $10 gift cards for the first 300 customers in line!!
  • Other counties provided updates on HHW events, electronics, thermometer exchanges, etc.

Wastewater Treatment Facility

Speaker: President of the Atlantic County Wastewater Treatment Facility Richard Dovey provided an overview of Atlantic County ’s Green Energy initiatives.

The Wind Farm Project fully came on line in July of 2006.  The project was bid in February of 2005 so there was a quick turn around time from start to finish.  This is the second largest windmill in NJ and 60% of project was rebated from BPU.  Remaining funds were borrowed from NJ Environmental Trust at a 1% interest rate!  Maintenance on solar farm is close to nil.  Life expectancy of windmills is about 10 years.  They are saving about $35,000 in electricity at facility.  ACAU owns it and bids out “green” credits.  Currently selling for $220 per credit.

Atlantic City Waste Treatment Facility has largest biodiesel fuel fleet in the state.  They currently have 120 vehicles that run on biodiesel (B20).  State contract vendor is in Woodruff.  Biodiesel is slightly more expensive than diesel but has less pollution.  They have also purchased several hybrid vehicles – the BPU is offsetting costs through rebates  for each vehicle purchased.  GM’s Silverado is on state contract.

Adjournment

Meeting was adjourned at 12:15 pm. for a quick lunch before the tour of the facility.  Everyone joined Diana Vigilante in thanking Ron Berenato from the ACUA for providing lunch and being such a gracious host.

1996-12-15 – A Year in Review – NJ HHW County Programs 1996

On December 5,1996 the ANJHHWC conducted its final meeting of year. The highlight of the meeting was the discussion of the year in HHW as each County told tales of their experiences and programs. These discussions are summarized below.

  1. Atlantic – Conducted 3 HHW days. In addition, the 1st Saturday of each month is paint, battery, oil and antifreeze recycling at the recycling facility.
  2. Bergen – Conducted 3 HHW disposal days. Republic Environmental conducted the program and it was bid on a price per pound for different categories of waste. This lead to problems tracking the large quantities of waste collected at each event. There were a total 6,700 participants at the 3 days, 440,000 pounds of waste were collected and it averaged $34.00 per car. At the last event the contractor was way understaffed which lead to waits up to one hour. In 1997 the County will try recycling latex paint with Murrel Paint located in Bayonne, N.J.
  3. Burlington – Only County to operate a full scale permanent HHW facility in N.J. They managed 400,000 pounds of HHW from 2,000 – 2,500 participants for lower costs than the previous year. They are managing oil-based paints as a universal waste through municipal drop-off sites. The municipalities collect the easier & safer to manage HHW and deliver it to the County facility. The County signs a bill of lading when they receive this waste. The County recycles its own latex paint (low-tech) and sells it for $1.00 per gallon. It goes quickly at this rate. The County recycled 46,000 feet of fluorescent bulbs primarily from schools.
  4. Camden -  Conducted 4 HHW disposal days plus 6 additional paint only days. Wade Environmental was the contractor and the contract was based on a price per pound. The cost were $0.47/pound for HHW and $0.32/pound for paint. For the HHW days they average 800 – 1,000 cars and had 2,200 participants for the paint days. If HHW showed up at the paint days Wade handled it. They have batteries collection sites at schools. The first paint day only had 14 people show up because it was scheduled for the Saturday of Memorial Day. They started a thermostat collection program through HVAC dealers that is not flourishing. Suggested that the promotion was not adequate.
  5. Cape May - No information posted.
  6. Cumberland - Conducted 3 HHW disposal days. They got some of their sewerage authorities to chip in to pay for one of the events. Wade Environmental was the contractor and they had no problems. The contract was on price per pound and it was for $0.51/pound. They have a school hazardous waste inventory program where they work with schools to help them manage the hazardous wastes internally and then schedule deliveries to the HHW days. They brings oil and antifreeze tanks on-site for bulk containerization. For promotion, they suggest that 8½” x 11″ inserts in newspapers are cost effective but you need to reserve this space early. People show up to the disposal days with these inserts in their hands.
  7. Essex - No information posted.
  8. Gloucester - Conducted 2 HHW disposal days plus 3 paint only recycling days. Wade Environmental was the contractor and did a good job. The contractor was based on a price per pound with costs of $0.49/pound for HHW and $0.37 for paint. The costs for 1996 were down 12% from 1995. They accept up to 200 pounds of hazardous waste from schools and municipalities. Anything over that has to be paid for by the generator.
  9. Hudson - No information posted.
  10. Hunterdon  - Conducted 4 HHW disposal days. They had two contractors during the year, due to bid sequencing and they were Clean Venture and Republic. They averaged 300 cars per event and an average cost per car of $35 – $50. They collect batteries at drop-off sites in schools then inmates sort them by type. They call in C.R. Warner to do oil, antifreeze and diesel fuel collection and recycling during their HHW days. PCB’s in drums of paint and paying for this became an issue in one of their contracts.
  11. Mercer - No information posted.
  12. Middlesex - Conducted 7 HHW disposal days and averaged between 500 and 700 people per disposal day. Radiac Research was the contractor and contract was based on a per car basis. The programs ended up costing approximately $34.00 per car. A participant arrived with crystallized ether late during one of the days causing a closing 15 minutes early. It was safely disposed of by the County’s bomb squad.
  13. Monmouth - Conducted 5 HHW disposal days with both Radiac Research and Wade Environmental as contractors. They have 7 health department employees help on the disposal days. Their permanent facility had its ribbon cutting ceremony in the fall but it is not open yet. Making all of the electrical components in the permanent facility’s building inherently explosion proof has caused several delays.
  14. Morris - Conducted 4 HHW disposal days and had 2,200 participants. The contract was based on a per car plus a setup cost per day. The contract was bid at $0.00 per car and $17,900 per participant. There were no other costs. Collected approximately 250,000 pound of HHW throughout the year. In addition, the County accepted approximately 50 drums of batteries managed by Focus Recycling. It has just started a fluorescent bulb recycling program that has not caught on yet where the County will accept bulbs for $0.15/foot including packaging. It has received its permanent HHW facility permit approval from NJDEP and will be going out for construction bids in January 1997.
  15. Ocean - Conducted 26 HHW disposal days throughout the year and handled 9,900 cars collecting 925,000 pounds of HHW. The contractor was Clean Venture/Cycle-Chem and it was based on a price per pound all inclusive including PCBs. The participants must pre-register and reserve space to go to an event. Feels demand in Ocean has peaked and for the first time they had to try hard to promote the program in order to fill the available appointments. In addition, they take in oil, antifreeze, batteries and empty paint cans at their county recycling center. Managed 40,000 pounds of batteries through Wade Environmental and also recycle 975 gallons of oil/month at the recycling center.
  16. Passaic - Conducted 1 HHW disposal day and had Rem-Tech Environmental as the contractor who did a good job. It was on October 19th which was a day of torrential downpours experienced by several counties but they program went well. The price was bid per pound and the cost per car turned out to be $35.00 per car.
  17. Salem - No information posted.
  18. Somerset - Conducted 4 HHW disposal days. Clean Venture was the contractor and the contract was on a per car basis. They had 2,000 participants for the year and the events cost approximately $20,000 per event. They collect batteries curbside throughout the County and deliver approximately 20 drums of batteries per event for recycling.
  19. Sussex - Conducted 2 HHW disposal days. They serviced more cars this year for less money. Their contract was based on a price/net pound.
  20. Union - Conducted 6 HHW disposal days. Cycle-Chem was the contractor and the price was based on price per pound plus setup per day. The cost was $0.23/pound plus $17,000 setup cost per HHW day. The average cost was $34.00 per car. They averaged between 500 – 800 participants per day. They had a problem of a small leak in a roll-off that was caught on film by a resident and it caused the cancellation of an entire program. They recycled 25 tons of batteries that they collected from drop-off sites for $0.23 per pound. There was a contest between schools to see which one could recycle the most batteries.
  21. Warren - Conducted 2 HHW days where there were 3 simultaneous collection sites throughout the county. EcoFlow, out of North Carolina, was the contractor and did a good job. Managed 80 drums of batteries during the HHW disposal days.

1996-08-01 – Paint Collections … The Programs of the Future???

By Carole Majorossy, Middlesex County Dept of Solid Waste Management, August 1996

When Middlesex County evaluated different HHW collection methods, it was discovered that paint made up over 50% of the materials received at the 6 – 8 Middlesex County HHW days held each year. It was at that time that it decided to explore the possibility of collecting paint during separate collections, in addition to the regular HHW program. 

Middlesex County is not the first to investigate the idea of collecting paints separately from other Household Hazardous Wastes. Atlantic County has had a monthly paint drop-off program since 1994. Residents are able to bring latex- and oil-based paints to the county’s recycling center on one Saturday each month. Atlantic County contracts with a vendor who removes the paint from the recycling center. Thereafter, the vendor recycles the usable latex paint and disposes of the oil-based paint. From January through November 1995, residents brought 115,834 pounds of paint to the recycling center. Atlantic County receives paint from approximately 75 to 100 residents each month.

Atlantic County also decided to take back the recycled latex paint from their vendor for resale to commercial and residential customers. The paint is tested by the vendor through an extensive QA/QC process before it is accepted for resale by the county. The one-gallon paint containers sell under the name “Ecopaint” and are available as interior or exterior paint in a variety of colors. Atlantic County reports that they have sold over 4,000 gallons to date.

Other counties have or plan to start similar programs. Gloucester County holds three recycling days for paints and other recyclable HHW in addition to its two regular HHW days. Ocean County is also planning to begin a separate paint recycling program.

As for Middlesex County, the County hopes to have in place, in 1997, six or more permanent drop off locations for paint at their municipal/county public works yards. The plan is to collect oil- and latex-based paints at a minimum and contract with a vendor to pick up the paint at the various drop off sites.

The benefits of a separate paint collection are obvious: It allows for an isolated collection of the majority of HHW materials so that regular HHW days are less busy and less costly. For those counties whose HHW day experiences are not always fun, this type of program may be the option!